A Quantitative Measure of Hope: A working paper

Over the past year an a half I’ve been working as a Research Assistant with the Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security Policy – Burma. Housed at Michigan State University, the project is generously funded by USAID’s Bureau of Food Security. It has been a tremendous experience. I’ve traveled to Myanmer twice (see… Continue reading A Quantitative Measure of Hope: A working paper

The Economics of Hope: Research Methodology and Identification Strategy

Yesterday I presented the plan for my thesis research in my department’s weekly Brown Bag Seminar. I had two objectives for the presentation: the first was to introduce this idea of ‘the economics of hope’ and second to receive feedback on a potential thesis research project. I received a lot of good comments and feedback on… Continue reading The Economics of Hope: Research Methodology and Identification Strategy

Measuring Hope: Lessons from Rural Myanmar [Post-Op Notes]

For those who don’t know, a great new blog about applied development economics was launched last academic year. Managed by some folks over in Cornell’s Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management the “Economics That Really Matters” blog references Theodore Schultz’s 1979 Nobel Lecture when he said the following: Most of the people in the… Continue reading Measuring Hope: Lessons from Rural Myanmar [Post-Op Notes]

Handbook Chapter on Agri-Food Value Chains in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

Last month my esteemed co-authors, Marc Bellemare and Sunghun Lim, and I published a chapter on agri-food value chains within low- and middle-income countries in volume six of the Handbook of Agricultural Economics. It was both a huge honor and a huge undertaking to write this chapter about such a rich and important literature. A… Continue reading Handbook Chapter on Agri-Food Value Chains in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

Have an ordinal dependent variable? Use this robustness test.

Ordinal variables are everywhere. Data providing information about happiness, levels of customer satisfaction, employees’ satisfaction, mental stress, psychological well-being, societal trust, and other important variables are now regularly collected and analyzed by national governments, large multinational companies, and researchers. However, because these data are not directly observable or quantitatively measurable, they are thus not measured… Continue reading Have an ordinal dependent variable? Use this robustness test.